Donnerstag, 15. Februar 2018

Bubblewrap Cowl

I like to experiment with short rows and their effects on variegated yarn. With this piece I wanted to explore three-dimensional elements. The result was a stylish cowl with an organic look.
This cowl is basically knitted only in garter stitch, but with some increases and decreases combined with short rows to achieve the three-dimensional effect. It is stared with a provisional cast on, knitted flat and joined invisibly by grafting in garter stitch.

Using one skein of Wollmeise Twin (about 150 grams of any other fingering weight wool) the cowl will be long enough to fit twice around your neck.


The pattern contains a long stitch-by-stitch version, a shorter version that may be helpful once you've got the idea of how to knit one bubble, plus a schematic of the bubble placement and a chart of a bubble.
It is available for purchase on Ravelry here. Get a 30% discount until February 22, 2018.





Materials
  • about 150 grams of fingering weight yarn – I used Wollmeise Twin – colorway “Martha”, for a pattern such as this variegated yarn looks good, especially with a really short color gradient
  • scrap yarn and a crochet hook for provisional CO - here's a photo of the hank before winding.
  • 3.25 mm knitting needles - I used circulars, but straight needles will do as well
  • 5 stitch markers
  • a tapestry needle to graft and to weave in ends


Size and Gauge
The finished cowl (that used up almost all of a 150 grams skein of fingering weight yarn) measures 20 cm in width and 110 cm in circumference, i.e. it fits twice around your neck.




Necessary Skills

In order to finish this cowl you need the following knitting skills.
  • Provisional CO
  • Basic increases and decreases (kfb and ssk)
  • Grafting in garter stitch
  • German short rows (there is also an explanation on how to convert the pattern to "wrap and turn" short rows)



Mittwoch, 7. Februar 2018

Bartkauz Shoulder Warmer

Like many women I tend to feel cold ... practically always except in high summer. That's why I wanted a sort of shoulder warmer or poncho to keep me warm at work.
I chose a light-weight merino yarn in different grey tones that - colors that are compatible with an office environment.
The piece is knitted flat - starting with a provisional cast on and knitted sideways with a combination of short row ribs and a lace pattern to make it interesting, and it is finished with Kitchener stitch.
Because of the short rows, this piece is wider at the bottom than at the top - so that it fits nicely around your shoulders. You can wear it either as a cowl or as a shoulder warmer / poncho.


Bartkauz is the german name for the Great Grey Owl. The color of the cowl reminded me of its plumage.

Creative Commons License
This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.






Materials
  • about 100 grams of lace weight yarn - I used Schachenmeyer Merino Extra Fine Lace (link to the yarn's Ravelry page)
  • 3.75mm needles (straight or circular)
  • scrap yarn and a crochet hook for provisional CO
  • tapestry needle for grafting and to weave in ends


Techniques
  • Provisional CO: My favorite method for a provision CO is the crochet provisional CO - it is shown in this Youtube video by New Stitch a Day.
  • Shadow Wrap Short Rows: the last stitch you knit (or purl) before turning, is worked into the stitch in the row below (also called the "mother-stitch"), which also leaves you with a pair of stitches that has to be worked as one in the row above. This method is shown in this YouTube video by Lee Meredith
  • Grafting in stockinette stitch (also called Kitchener Stitch): a way to seamlessly join two rows of live stitches - as shown in this YouTube video by WEBS America's Yarn Store.

Gauge and Size
When knitting in garter stitch 12 stitches gave about 5 cm in width, and 11 garter stitch ridges (i.e. 22 rows) about 5 cm in height.
After blocking, the finished piece measures 40 cm in height. The circumference in 140 cm at the lower edge and 75 cm at the upper edge - however, the pattern is written in a way that the circumference can be adapted.

Lace Chart
If you prefer to knit lace from a chart, here's a chart for the lace pattern. The part within the red rectangles is one repeat of the lace pattern.


Row 1: k all
Row 2: p all
Row 3: k3, *k2tog, yo, yo, ssk repeat from * until 3 sts from end, k3
Row 4: p3 * p1, (k1, p1) into double yo, p1 repeat from * until 3 sts from end, p3
Row 5: k all
Row 6: p all
Row 7: k1, *k2tog, yo, yo, ssk repeat from * until 1 st from end, k1
Row 8: p1 * p1, (k1, p1) into double yo, p1 repeat from * until 1 st from end, p1


Instructions

Do a provisional CO of 90 sts

Setup Rows
Row 1: p all
Row 2: k all
Row 3: k all
Row 4: p all

Part A) Short Row Sequence
Ridge 1: p70, k into mother stitch and turn, k to end
Ridge 2: k60, p into mother stitch and p to end
Ridge 3: p50, k into mother stitch and turn, k to end
Ridge 4: k40, p into mother stitch and p to end
Ridge 5: p30, k into mother stitch and turn, k to end
Ridge 6: k20, p into mother stitch and p to end
Ridge 7: p10, k into mother stitch and turn, k to end
Ridge 8: k19, k into mother stitch and p to end
Ridge 9: p29, p into mother stitch and turn, k to end
Ridge 10: k39, k into mother stitch and p to end
Ridge 11: p49, p into mother stitch and turn, k to end
Ridge 12: k59, k into mother stitch and p to end
Ridge 13: p69, p into mother stitch and turn, k to end

Part B) Transition to Lace
Row 1: k all
Row 2: p all
Row 3: p all
Row 4: k all
Row 5: k all
Row 6: p all

Part C) Lace Pattern
Row 1: k all
Row 2: p all
Row 3: k3, *k2tog, yo, yo, ssk repeat from * until 3 sts from end, k3
Row 4: p3 * p1, (k1, p1) into double yo, p1 repeat from * until 3 sts from end, p3
Row 5: k all
Row 6: p all
Row 7: k1, *k2tog, yo, yo, ssk repeat from * until 1 st from end, k1
Row 8: p1 * p1, (k1, p1) into double yo, p1 repeat from * until 1 st from end, p1
Repeat rows 1 to 8 once more
Then knit rows 1 to 6 once.

Part D) Transition to Short Row Sequence
= Part B

Repeat Parts A to D six times more or until the lower edge nearly fits around your shoulders.
Then repeat parts A to C once more.

Graft in stockinette stitch.



Freitag, 2. Februar 2018

Leftovers

When you knit a lot, you always have leftovers ... and it's usually difficult to find suitable projects for them. One idea is to use different leftovers (three at a time) and switching colors after each row. And once one skein is finished to replace it with the next one. This means that the colors are evenly distributed - and the unused yarn can be carried up easily after each row.
So I looked through my stash and picked all kinds of fingeringh weight yarns in different shades of blue. Than I started with a chevron pattern on a bias - with the plan of knitting a cowl (flat, starting with a provisional CO and finished by grafting).


I really liked it at the beginning, but I hadn't reckoned with the fact that my leftovers were a bit too long to achieve the sort of randomness that I had hoped for. So that nearly half of the piece is blue with turquoise, and the next half would be blue with another color inbetween - and I don't like the idea of two halves of my cowl being so different in color - mixed up would be OK but not with such a clear border. Also, I^ve started to think that the piece is not wide enough for my taste - even though I did a cast on of 100 stitches, only half of them make up the width.


Currently, I'm not sure whether I will continue this piece, frog it and start in the same color scheme but with 5 strands at the same time (and switching them after each row, but that's a yarn tangle waiting to happen), or whether I'll start something with different leftovers - chosen not only for their colors but also for their length :)