Freitag, 21. August 2015

Random Bubbles Lace Scarf

As light as gossamer and as delicate as flower petals - this scarf is knitted from only one 50 gram skein of lace weight yarn.

Exploring the random lace technique a bit further - I wanted to knit a shaped scarf. And to make the counting a bit easier, I thought I'd use the shaping of the Seifenblasen Lace Scarf - which worked quite well in the end. This means that random lace sections will be alternated with sections of garter stitch with short rows.

Please note: This is not a stitch-by-stitch pattern. The Random sections are knitted, well, at random – giving you a unique piece of knitware. Therefore, there are no detailed pattern instructions for these sections. However, the instructions give you rules and guidelines on how to produce a piece of random lace that looks similar to the one in the pictures.



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Materials or What You Need to Knit
  • Yarn, I’d suggest something that blocks well (i.e. with a high percentage of wool) in fingering weight or finer. For the scarf in the pictures, I used a bit less than 50 grams of lace weight yarn Lace Top by Lana Stop 
  • Needles (a bit bigger than what the yarn calls for), I used 3.25 mm needles.
  • Tapestry needle to weave in ends
  • The ability and the willingness to count your stitches over and over again … since there are not pattern repeats or anything that could help, it’s easy to lose track of where you are in the row. This is a concentration exercise, i.e. NOT something that I would take to my local knitting group. Since it’s be impossible for me to follow a conversation and count stitches at the same time, it’d make me very unsocial :)
  • The patience to knit a piece that will look extremely crumpled and not very attractive, while you are knitting it. I will look so much better after blocking - see picture below. 



Techniques and Abbreviations


Instructions to knit the scarf

CO12 sts
Step 1: Knit one random lace section, i.e. 16 rows of random lace
Step 2: Knit one increasing short row section (see instructions below)
Repeat steps 1 and 2 until your scarf is about half as wide as you want it to be and knit another random lace section (16 rows of random lace)
(for me this was the case after 14 random lace sections)

Step 3: Knit a neutral short row section (see instructions below)
Step 4: Knit on random lace section, i.e. 16 rows of random lace

Step 5: Knit a decreasing short row section (see instructions below)
Step 6: Knit a random lace section, i.e. 16 rows of random lace
Repeat steps 5 and 6 until there are 12 sts on your needles (the number of increasing short row sections should be equal to the number of decreasing short row sections)

Bind off loosly.
Weave in ends and block.


How to Knit Random Lace Section
  • Basically, knit decreases and yarn-overs in a random manner and make sure that after a row you have the same number of stitches you started with. That’s it.
  • Distribute the increases and decreases evenly within one row, i.e. don’t make too many decreases before you do increases (and vice-versa) – or else your piece will look crooked – at least before blocking.
  • After a bit of trying, I only counted the increases and decreases, i.e. “plus one” for every yarn over and “minus one” for every decrease, and making sure that the count is zero at the end of a row. This worked fine for the first few random sections (i.e. section with less than 25 or so stitches), but after the rows got longer, it became difficult to keep track and I had to recount the row. I guess it doesn’t matter if you lose one stitch in a row, as long as you make it up in the next one.
  • To have a knit-effect on RS, I only did “knit-decreases” (e.g. k2tog, ssk, sl1-k2tog-psso) on RS and purl-decreases (e.g. p2tog, p2togtbl, p3tog) on WS. For increases I only did yarn overs or yarn over twice (instead of mk1-stitches) to get “lacy” holes.
  • To get a nice edging, I started every RS row with sl1 purl-wise and every WS row with sl1 knit-wise.
  • About 20-25 percent of my stitches per row were yarn overs – with of course the matching number of decreases. If you do more, the lace will look more delicate; if you do less, it will look more structure – but both that’s a question of taste.
  • As a last advice, do not overthink this! If you get your stitch count right (roughly), it is practically impossible to mess this up.

Short Row Section - Increasing
Before knitting the section, devide the number of on your needles stitches by 4. This is your number X for the coming short row section.
(Since the scarf is started with 12 sts, for the 1st short row section X is 3 (12/4=3), then there are 4 sts more on your needles and for the 2nd short row section X=4 (16/4=4), for the 3rd X=5 (20/4=5), for the 4th X=6 and so on.)

Ridge 1: sl1 (k-wise), k to end, turn, sl1 (p-wise), k to last 2 sts, kfb, k
Ridge 2: sl1 (k-wise), k up to and including Xth st before end, w+t, k to last 2 sts, kfb, k
Ridge 3: sl1 (k-wise), k up to and including Xth st before last wrap, w+t, k to last 2 sts, kfb, k
Ridge 4: sl1 (k-wise), k up to and including Xth st before last wrap, w+t, k to last 2 sts, kfb, k
Ridge 5: sl1 (k-wise), k to end (you can pick up the wraps, but since it's garter stitch you don't have to), turn, sl1 (p-wise), k to end
During this short row section your stitch count was increased by 4 stitches.

Short Row Section - Neutral
Devide the number of on your needles stitches by 4. This is your number X for the coming short row section. (Here X should be one higher as X for the last increasing section.)
Ridge 1: sl1 (k-wise), k to end, turn, sl1 (p-wise), k to end
Ridge 2: sl1 (k-wise), k up to and including Xth st before end, w+t, k to end
Ridge 3: sl1 (k-wise), k up to and including Xth st before last wrap, w+t, k to end
Ridge 4: sl1 (k-wise), k up to and including Xth st before last wrap, w+t, k to end
Ridge 5: sl1 (k-wise), k to end (you can pick up the wraps, but since it's garter stitch you don't have to), turn, sl1 (p-wise), k to end
The number of stitches wasn't changed.

Short Row Section - Decreasing
Before knitting the section, devide the number of on your needles stitches by 4. This is your number X for the coming short row section. (X for the first decreasing short row section should be equal to X in the neutral short row section - for the following sections, X will always be one less than for the section before.)
Ridge 1: sl1 (k-wise), k to end, turn, sl1 (p-wise), k to last 3 sts, k2tog, k
Ridge 2: sl1 (k-wise), k X sts, w+t, k to last 3 sts, k2tog, k
Ridge 3: sl1 (k-wise), k up to and including the last wrapped stitch, k X sts, w+t, k to last 3 sts, k2tog, k
Ridge 4: sl1 (k-wise), k up to and including the last wrapped stitch, k X sts, w+t, k to last 3 sts, k2tog, k
Ridge 5: sl1 (k-wise), k to end (you can pick up the wraps, but since it's garter stitch you don't have to), turn, sl1 (p-wise), k to end
During this short row section your stitch count was decreased by 4 stitches.



This design was featured at Oombawka Design Link & Share Wednesday - Link Party 108. Thank you!

Oombawka Design

Kommentare:

  1. Antworten
    1. Danke für den lieben (und superschnellen :) Kommentar.
      Liebe Grüsse zurück!

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  2. I can't wait to cast on! Just my kind of thing - I love full-attention projects, Thank you so much for sharing it.
    Jan (webberjewels on Ravelry)

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    Antworten
    1. Thank you - this is definitely a full-attention project. Happy knitting!

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  3. What a unique way to knit a gorgeous shawl! Love the look.

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  4. Just beautiful! Found you on Ravelry.

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  5. What a pretty scarf! And a nice yarn, too. Thanks for sharing the pattern! Sunny weekend greetings from your new follower Nata

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  6. This so pretty it's beautiful! thank you for linking to the stash link up. :)

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  7. süperr ! süperrr !!!..
    http://ayselmelike.blogspot.com.tr/

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  8. Gibt's da auch eine deutsche Anleitung dazu

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  9. Gibt's da auch eine deutsche Anleitung dazu

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  10. Dieser Kommentar wurde vom Autor entfernt.

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  11. Gibt's die Anleitung auch auf deutsch

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  12. Gibt's diese Anleitung auch auf deutsch

    AntwortenLöschen
  13. Gibt's diese Anleitung auch auf deutsch

    AntwortenLöschen